Assessment

Psychological testing serves a range of different purposes—whether you’re looking to put a name to an unknown problem, need updated testing for an IEP or clarity about a student’s academic strengths and weaknesses, need psychological clearance for a surgical procedure or job, or are hoping to get accommodations on standardized testing.

Psychoeducational Testing

What is a psychoeducational evaluation?

A psychoeducational evaluation is a series of tests that are done to determine an individual’s cognitive strengths and weaknesses, and how these relate to academic performance. Through testing, we find out what the problem is, how it manifests itself, and what we can do to help overcome it.

Who should get a psychoeducational evaluation done?

Anyone from early elementary school age to an adult in graduate school could benefit from a psychoeducational evaluation. If it seems reading, writing, math, taking tests, paying attention, remembering, getting homework done, understanding directions, or something else is causing more difficulty than for peers, a psychoeducational evaluation can help.

Psychoeducational evaluations are also useful if you feel that you need accommodations such as extended time for standardized tests such as the SATs, ACTs, GMATs, MCATs, or LSATs.

Students who already have or may need an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) or 504 Plan also require psychoeducational testing. This helps ensure that the plan is up-to-date, reflects the individual’s current needs, and gives them the accommodations that are going to be most helpful to them.

What kind of testing does a psychoeducational evaluation involve?

A psychoeducational evaluation has several components. We’ll do intellectual testing, achievement testing (reading, writing, math), language testing (speaking and listening), and emotional testing. By “casting a large net” with our testing, we are best able to identify what is going on, which informs our recommendations for how you can function at your best. For example, if an individual is having a hard time paying attention in class, it may be because they have ADHD. Or they may be anxious. Or they may have difficulty understanding spoken language. This is to say that the number of reasons is high, and if we only gave one type of test, it would be very easy to miss what’s going on with the person.

What should I expect?

A typical psychoeducational evaluation takes a full day—about 9:00 AM until 5:00 PM, with a 30-60 minute break for lunch in the middle of the day, and short breaks as needed throughout. You’ll come in, get settled, and then speak with the testing psychologist for about an hour. You’ll talk about a broad range of subjects, from your very early development to what has been going on more recently. Then tests are administered, and this includes everything from working with blocks to answering questions about how you see yourself. If you need a break at any point, let the psychologist know.

What’s the end result of all of this?

After testing, the psychologist will score everything, look at how it all fits together, and write a report. That report then serves as the basis for a feedback meeting. You’ll come in for the feedback meeting, usually a few weeks after testing, and talk with the psychologist about the findings. At the end of the report will be a list of recommendations to help deal with the challenges that testing revealed. You’ll get a copy of the report, and if you would like, you can sign a form so that the psychologist can send the report to a school, tutor, or other individual that can help.

How much does a psychoeducational evaluation cost?

A psychoeducational evaluation performed at Kelly Counseling & Consulting typically costs $2,800. Depending on the reason you’re coming in, we may need to do more tests with you, or fewer tests. This affects the cost. Insurance sometimes pays for all or part of testing. When you reach out to us, let us know that you are interested in using insurance, and have your insurance information handy so that we can check with them to see how much, if any, of the cost of testing is covered.

Diagnostic Screening

What is diagnostic screening?

Oftentimes an individual will have a sense that there has always (or more recently) been something seeming to get in the way of living their best life or otherwise causing them difficulty. Diagnostic screening helps to answer the question of what that “something” is.

Who should have diagnostic screening done?

Anyone who hopes to be able to identify what it is that has been holding them back. Whether you suspect ADHD, depression, anxiety, psychosis, an Autism Spectrum Disorder, or something else, diagnostic screening can help put a label on what until now has just felt like a burden.

What kind of testing does a diagnostic screening involve?

That depends. When you first speak with the psychologist, he or she will come up with some hypotheses that could explain your difficulties. The tests will be chosen based on these hypotheses. Diagnostic screening may consist of any combination of intellectual testing, achievement testing, executive function testing, memory testing, neuropsychological testing, or emotional testing.

What should I expect?

A typical diagnostic screening involves about an hour of speaking with a psychologist about a range of different topics—your early development (did you walk, talk, learn to read, etc. at an appropriate age?), when your difficulties began, how your symptoms have changed over time, and more. Our clinical interviews aren’t set in stone, so we’ll get some background information and talk about what seems most important. After that there will be some testing, although what kind depends on the question we’re trying to answer. Typically, diagnostic screening will take between two and four hours.

What’s the end result of a diagnostic screening?

A diagnosis, typically. We’ll bring you back in for a feedback meeting, which usually lasts about 45 minutes. We’ll talk about our findings and recommendations for how you can best manage your symptoms. Getting a diagnosis is often an immense relief to individuals who have known that something isn’t quite right, but haven’t been able to put their finger on it. It can also be scary. We’ll work with you to ensure that you leave our office with a solid understanding of what’s going on, and how best to move forward.

How much does a diagnostic screening cost?

A diagnostic screening at Kelly Counseling & Consulting typically costs about $500. Depending on the reason you’re coming in, we may need to do less testing, or we may need to do more. This affects the cost. Insurance sometimes pays for all or part of testing. When you reach out to us, let us know that you are interested in using insurance, and have your insurance information handy so that we can check with them to see how much, if any, of the cost of testing is covered.

Pre-Bariatric Screening

What is a pre-bariatric screening?

Bariatric surgery is immensely helpful to many individuals who have had difficulty losing weight through diet and exercise. Although you will experience weight loss following the procedure, the weeks, months, and years after will require you to be conscientious about what you eat and how active you are.
A pre-bariatric screening is performed to help your doctor determine how best to work with you, how best to support you, and how well-equipped you are for life after bariatric surgery.

Who should have a pre-bariatric screening done?

Anyone who is hoping to undergo bariatric surgery.

What kind of testing does pre-bariatric screening involve?

Pre-bariatric screening consists of completing a background information packet, a clinical interview, a pencil-and-paper test, and brief diagnostic screeners. Don’t be nervous about the pencil-and-paper test; there are no right or wrong answers. It consists of a number of sentences that you mark as either “true” or “false” about you, your personality, and your experiences.

What should I expect?

Once you’ve made your appointment, one of our psychologists will send you (via email or post) a background information packet for you to complete, along with several forms. You’ll bring these with you on the day of your appointment, at which point the psychologist will give you the pencil-and-paper test and screeners. While you fill those out, the psychologist will review your background information packet. He or she will then begin the clinical interview portion. The entire evaluation will take you about 60 to 90 minutes.

What’s the end result of a pre-bariatric screening?

We’ll write a report and send it off to your doctor. If we think it’s a good idea for you to wait before undergoing the surgery, we will contact you to let you know what areas are important for you to work on before undergoing the surgery. It’s important to remember that we want you to be happy and successful with the surgery—and sometimes that takes work.

How much does a pre-bariatric screening cost?

A pre-bariatric screening at Kelly Counseling & Consulting costs $275. Insurance sometimes pays for all or part of testing. When you reach out to us, let us know that you are interested in using insurance, and have your insurance information handy so that we can check with them to see how much, if any, of the cost of testing is covered.

Forensic Testing

What is forensic testing?

Forensic testing at Kelly Counseling & Consulting can include testing to determine whether an individual may qualify for governmental services; whether an individual is of sound mind as they write their will; whether and to what extent an individual has suffered long-lasting impacts from an accident or other trauma; and more.

Who should have forensic testing done?

If a governmental organization has indicated that you need psychological testing in order to qualify for services, if you are involved in a lawsuit (as a plaintiff, defendant, or counsel) and require information about one party’s psychological functioning, if you are writing your will and want to be sure that it isn’t challenged on the grounds that you were not of sound mind—there are any number of reasons an individual may seek forensic testing. Give our office a call to see how we can help you.

What kind of testing does forensic testing involve?

Because the reasons for referral tend to be quite different from case to case, we can’t say what specific kind of testing will be involved in your situation, although there will certainly be a clinical interview. It is likely there will also be performance-based and behavioral report measures administered as well.

What should I expect?

Again, forensic evaluations can vary widely, but you can expect to first speak on the phone with one of our clinicians in order to nail down the reason for referral. After that, you may be sent a background information packet to complete ahead of time; this helps us focus our clinical interview. Once the clinical interview is complete, we will administer whatever measures are relevant to the case at hand.

What’s the end result of forensic testing?

Although the end result may differ based on the reason for referral, we will write a report that addresses the referral questions and provide that to you, your counsel, or whomever needs the report. If the testing is done for a lawsuit, typically you, the one being evaluated, will not receive the report. If you are seeking to determine your eligibility for governmental or other services, a feedback meeting will occur.

How much does forensic testing cost?

That depends on the reason for referral and what kind of testing needs to be done. Please call our office for more information.

Testing for Admission into Diaconate/Religious Life

What is testing for acceptance into the diaconate or religious life?

For individuals hoping to engage in the process of human, spiritual, intellectual, and pastoral formation, psychological testing is often required to determine their present psychological functioning and their likelihood of success. Through this process we seek to identify a candidate’s strengths and areas for growth.

Who should have testing for acceptance into the diaconate or religious life done?

Those who require psychological testing prior to admission into a program of formation.

What does testing for acceptance into the diaconate or religious life entail?

Testing entails the completion of an extensive background information packet, a clinical interview, and test measures that informs us of one’s potential for human, spiritual, intellectual, and pastoral formation. This includes performance-based testing and behavioral report.

What should I expect?

You’ll receive a background information packet to complete and return to us prior to your testing day. This background packet serves as the basis for our clinical interview. There will be some performance-based measures and self-report measures. Testing usually takes 5-8 hours. A feedback meeting is then setup, at which point we review the findings of the testing with you and the director of formation or other representative.

What’s the end result of testing for acceptance into the diaconate or religious life?

We do not ultimately make the decision as to whether or not you will be accepted for formation. What we do is discuss with you and the appropriate representative the strengths you will likely bring to the experience, and where there are areas for you to work on through formation. The recommendations that we make are with an eye towards the developmental needs of the applicant.

How much does testing for acceptance into the diaconate or religious life cost?

Please call 610-358-2250 for information on pricing.